The Six Spooky Monsters of the Job Search

Terror! Screams! Horror! Coming to a career near you this season is – The Job Search, starring you!

Finding a new job should be about the promise of a new opportunity and the joy of finding a career that fulfills your professional passions. However, there are times when looking for that next career move can feel like a bad horror movie. Here are six spooky monsters you might run into on the job search and our advice for surviving their scares:

The Frankenstein Resume

A piece of a job here, and chunk of another here; sometimes putting together your best resume can feel like the job of a mad scientist! When the process of revising a resume begins, the messy document on the computer screen can truly seem like a hideous beast – a hodgepodge of experiences that doesn’t really add up. That’s no reason to chase it away with pitchforks and torches! Use your unique experiences to cobble together the story of your career, and your resume will be received with open arms.

Invisible Man Meets the Online Application

After navigating a tricky website and spending hours perfecting an application, pressing the “submit” button and finally applying for a job should be a wonderful feeling. Unfortunately, many websites do not send immediate confirmations that an application has been received, making it feel as though your hard work has simply vanished into thin air. Always keep a backup of your application responses on a personal resource, such as a computer or notepad, and be sure to follow up with the potential employer via phone or email a few days after submitting your materials to ensure delivery.

The Mummy’s Wardrobe

Like the pharaoh’s signature bandage-wear, a wardrobe malfunction can cause a job interview to unravel quickly. Rather than wearing something risky, it’s best to play it safe and avoid cursing the big day with treacherous clothing choices. Sensible shoes, neutral colors and a strategic splash of color is enough to set yourself apart as a professional fit to rule a kingdom!

Going King Kong on Your Ex-Boss

“Can you tell me about your previous position?”

“RAWR! SMASH!”

Anyone who has had to leave a job under not-so-sunny circumstances understands that it can be difficult to move forward; it can be easy to become bitter, and your side of the story deserves to be told! However, no one wants to work with someone who comes with a free dark cloud of negativity included. When encountering questions about negative employment experiences, keep things positive and try to focus on the lessons learned, rather than dwelling on the steps that led to the separation in the first place.

Dr. Jekyll, Mr. Hyde

You answered the questions. You shook hands. You smiled. You nailed that interview, right? How many times have you confidently left an interview dreaming of your new job, only to have your hopes dashed by a depressing call a few days later? When an unexpected rejection pops up, it can feel like there are two of you – one, the great candidate you know yourself to be, and the other, less-than-ideal applicant the company just turned away. Try not to take these experiences personally! Each negative response is a learning experience on the way to that next success.

Dracula’s Drain

Let’s be real, looking for a new job takes a lot out of you. Some days, it can feel like a vampire swung on by for a snack and sucked the life force right out of you! The good news is that vampires aren’t real, and that this feeling is only natural. After all, your career is a big deal. When you feel the long days of searching dragging on your spirit, give yourself a break. Spending time with friends and family or taking a day trip might just be enough to recharge your energy

Looking for a job can be scary, but with the right preparation, you’ll make it out alive and find yourself safely succeeding in a new role. Have a job search experience to share? We’d love to hear about in the comment section below!

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