Take Home Job Hunt Gold with the Winter Olympics

Team USA is headed to South Korea, folks! It’s no secret that our Olympic athletes are competing against the best of the best because of their talent and hard work. Much like an Olympic sport, job searching takes practice! Let’s take a look at the most anticipated winter games and job search lessons to learn from each:

  1. Figure-skating

Figure-skating is a popular sport in the winter Olympics with the glitzy outfits, undeniable athletic prowess and a gracefulness only skaters possess. Behind all of the glitz and glam, it takes true concentration to nail every jump and impress the judges. Even if a skater misses a landing, it’s crucial to their performance to continue with a smile. This year, the U.S. is determined to come home with their first Olympic medal since 2006.

Similarly, concentration and determination are both required throughout the job search process. From first applying to jobs, to all the way up through third-round interviews, composure is key. For instance, if you receive feedback from a potential employer that you have a misspelled word on your resume or you have an outfit malfunction at an interview, it’s important to learn from the lesson and keep going with a positive outlook. We all make mistakes, but concentrating on putting your best professional-self forward will help you land all of your jumps towards a job!

  1. Snowboarding

Snowboarding has always been the “cool” sport in the Winter Olympics, and the US has dominated in this arena for years. Names like Shaun White, Hannah Teter and Kelly Clark are familiar to any winter Olympic onlooker because they’ve mastered the sport.  Snowboarding is attractive because it takes true guts to strap booth feet to a board and speed down a giant mountain – all while spinning and flipping through the air!

Much like snowboarding, job searching takes a certain fearlessness. According to a 2013 survey from Harris Interactive and Everest College, as many as 92 percent of adults in the United States stress over one or more aspects of a job interview. This winter, make it a priority to be like the U.S. Olympic snowboarding team by taking the leap and overcoming your fears! To help boost your job search courage, have a trusted and knowledgeable peer review and revise each written piece of your application. Having a fresh set of eyes review your work will prevent errors. Feeling pre-interview jitters? Practice in the mirror! It’s always a great idea to prepare for questions instead of going in blind.

  1. Four-man bobsled

After the sudden, tragic loss of three-time Olympic medalist Steven Holcomb in 2017, all eyes are on the U.S. Olympic four-man bobsled team to clinch a medal during the 2018 Winter Olympics. There’s no question that this event takes the work of all four teammates to win this event, and with the loss of a key player, the U.S. called on another athlete to take the reins.

The job search is similar to the four-man bobsled event because it has many different parts that come together in the end. From an engaging cover letter, to a thorough resume and polished job interview skills, in order to be successful during a job hunt, it’s important to recognize how each individual section is part of the whole. If you spend too much time perfecting your online presence through LinkedIn, but you lack resume-writing skills, the whole “sled” – or your search for a new job – could crash! Be sure to spend equal amount of time and energy on each piece of your job search to be successful!

A job search is no easy feat, much like competing in the Olympics! We can’t all be superhuman like some of our favorite athletes, but we can control the course of our job search. As you watch the games this winter, think about all of the lessons apply to your job journey. Take notes from the hard work and commitment of Team U.S.A. and their world of competition! If you have any job search tips that relate to the Olympic Games this winter, please share below:

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