Sharing career accomplishments should be the easy part of searching for a new job, right? Unfortunately, when it comes to resumes, even the good stuff can become a bit complicated. Take, for example, a situation in which you’ve held multiple roles at a single organization. You invested valuable time, grew as a professional and even earned promotions along the way. That’s great! The tricky part is illustrating this in a way that’s not confusing for employers, while highlighting the progress you’ve made.

If you’re having trouble showcasing multiple positions at one company on your resume, here are two ways to go about sharing the information: 

Option 1: Stacking

Let’s say you changed jobs in an organization, but the roles were similar in a lot of ways. For example, maybe you started as an intern, grew into a sales trainee and ended as a full-fledged sales associate. While the titles may have changed, the general nature of the jobs were the same as you added more responsibilities to your plate. This would be a great opportunity to stack the titles together! 

To follow this format, you’ll only need to list the company name and location once, including the overall date range of your employment next to it. Then, underneath the company name, you’ll “stack” all of the positions on top of each other, with the most recent title at top. Be sure to also include the time frame for each role in the organization next to the titles.

Here’s an example of the stacked format for multiple positions at one company on your resume: 

ROADRUNNER INC., CHICAGO, IL – MAY 2018 – PRESENT

Sales Associate, January 2019 – Present

Sales Trainee, August 2018 – December 2019

Intern, May 2018 – August 2018

  • List accomplishments
  • List accomplishments
  • List accomplishments

Notice in the example above that a bulleted list of accomplishments should follow right under the earliest held role at the organization in question. In addition to following the best practices for resume bullet points, such as including using strong action words, you’ll want to make special note of the reasons for your promotion(s) here. Which projects set you apart and paved the way for you to climb the ladder at this organization?

The stacking method is a great route to go for saving space on your resume, and for keeping similar types of roles grouped together. 

Option 2: Separating

Let’s say you stayed at a company for a few years, but took on a wider variety of roles during that time. If the positions were different enough, it might make more sense to separate them out on a resume. This is especially true in the case of lateral moves that took you from one department to another with an entirely different focus.

Here’s an example of  the separated format for multiple positions at one company on your resume: 

ROADRUNNER INC., CHICAGO, IL – MAY 2018 – PRESENT

Content Marketing Coordinator, August 2019 – Present 

  • List accomplishments
  • List accomplishments
  • List accomplishments

Sales Intern, May 2018 – August 2019

  • List accomplishments
  • List accomplishments
  • List accomplishments

In this example, while sales and marketing may be interrelated departments, the work you were doing as a sales intern was different enough from your content marketing experience to warrant separate resume listings. 

Note that when using this format, you typically will only need to list the company (along with location and overall dates) once. The exception to this rule is in situations where you may have left a company, then returned at a later date; in these cases, you may need to list the company name a second time after an interim role to keep things easy to read and in chronological order.

Choose What Works Best for Your Career

There’s no perfect way to write a resume. While some folks might be better served by stacking similar roles, others might need to fill out their resumes by focusing in on the responsibilities for each role at a company individually. No matter how you format your resume, the most important thing is to showcase the why behind your advancement. It’s not enough to show that you made it from point A to point B within a given company; your resume needs to tell the story of your accomplishments in every setting.

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